Susan Craig Romance

Every story is a journey…

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Book Launch!!! (splash!)

Excitement, trepidation, and the nervous willies accompany every book launch. In six days I’ll have my first book launch–a relaunch– in some time. Mostly, I am curious. How will it go?

When I began writing as an Indie writer (a writer who self-publishes via Kindle Direct Publishing or some other online venue), I simply wrote my book and pushed the publish button. I tossed my baby out into the digital world and hoped for the best.

Amazingly, things went well. (That’s more rare then you’d think.) And it lasted for a few months. Then my sales numbers dropped off a cliff. I’ve learned that the drop-off-a-cliff phenomenon is NOT uncommon. It occurs when authors have no clue how to market a book.

That was me. Clueless. And then busy with job changes and family moves and a dozen other things that put my publishing venture on the back burner. For years.

About a year ago I got serious about my writing work. Again. I decided to relaunch my original trilogy while working on two new novels. I learned about marketing. I soaked up all the advice out there (a LOT) on launching a book. I followed the suggestions I could afford… contacting reviewers, sending out Advance Reader copies and so forth. (Buying book ads was NOT in my budget!)

Now, finally, in only six days I get to see if my efforts will pay off. So, yes…excitement, trepidation, and lots of nervous willies!

The book that will launch on Amazon August 30th is Something Blue. It is the story of a woman stuck running the family company–a position for which she was groomed her whole life, but that feels to her like an itchy too-tight sweater. The executive role she is so good at playing does not fit her true personality at all. So, she feels like a fraud (in addition to wanting to scratch).

She agrees to sell her company to a hot, sexy entrepreneur (Of COURSE he’s hot and sexy…it’s a romance!!) but doesn’t trust him to run the company without her supervision. You can guess that they fall in love, but HOW it happens, and the pitfalls in their way…ah! Therein lies the story!!

If you haven’t read it already, you should check it out.

So think of me on August 30th, as I sit here holding my breath, waiting to see if my baby book can swim.

In the meantime, I wish you and yours an awesome autumn,
Until next time…
Susan Craig

By

Decision Dilemmas

Sometimes we have to start walking
to find out where we are headed.

Eat the big one first.  As a rule for life, this had served my two and a half year old son well so far, but now he was stumped.  In each chubby hand he held a perfect vanilla wafer.  Looking at the mirror-image cookies, his mental motor stalled.  What to do?  He prepared to bite the right hand cookie, but then the other caught his eye. He brought his left hand up, then moved it away to take another look.  Finally he set both cookies down and frowned.

I recognized the frustration.  How does one decide between two good choices?  Or two bad ones?  The time I’ve spent frozen into immobility by the need to choose must surely measure in years by now.  Lacking the ability to see far enough down either path for comfort, I fear to move ahead. How to break the stalemate?

Some years ago, I had to choose between two jobs.  One was in science, the field I’d trained to enter only five years before.  It was prestigious, in Boston.  It meant working with a great team, people I knew and respected.  The other was in my home town.  It was in teaching, a field in which I had ten years experience.  Although not a lucrative position, it offered important intangible rewards—a chance to touch lives.  How would I ever decide?

I asked the advice of friends.  I made lists of the pros and cons for each position.  I went to Boston and visited the laboratory there.  I talked to teachers at the school in town. Logic seemed to favor moving East, but the scales were closely balanced.  I just wasn’t sure.

After weeks of deliberation, I decided it was time to choose. There would be no more fooling around, even if it meant flipping a coin.  I would decide tonight.  My teenage son left to spend the night with his friend David.  Alone, I deliberated, pondered, prayed.  Finally I decided to move East.  Opportunities for the future seemed better there.  Not elated, but at peace, I got ready for bed.  Then the phone rang.  It was David’s parents.  Could my son go to Giddings, Texas with them?  They’d have him back in three or four days.

No problem!  I hung up anticipating a few quiet days.  I had no worries, no concerns.  But move to Boston?  No way! What had I been thinking?  Thirteen year olds needed friends, and I needed those friends to have parents that I’d known for years and could trust absolutely.  Suddenly my choice was clear.

I failed to value my home town ties accurately until I had decided to give them up.  I didn’t recognize the disadvantages of moving away until I had embraced the advantages it would bring.  Sometimes, you just don’t see clearly until you make a choice.

I should have remembered.  That was how my son had solved the cookie dilemma.  He chose one and took a bite.  Then he put it down, reassessed the situation, and ate the big one first.

What decision dilemmas do you face?
How do you make up your mind?

Until next time…
–Susan.